Currently viewing the tag: "CITT"

This is indeed Miami-Dade County’s largest transportation event.

It’s most important that we, the citizenry, attend and speak-up about our own thoughts on the future of public transportation in our community.

Among the more notable and praiseworthy highlights of this past Saturday’s Transportation Summit Community Forum was the commentary made by Mr. Adam Old.

A councilperson for the small Miami-Dade County municipality of the Village of El Portal, and an active member of the recently formed Transit Action Committee (TrAC), Mr. Old was perhaps the only municipal representative at the forum.

He was also one of only a handful of people who sought to redirect the focus of the meeting away from the relatively minor gripes of the transit-riding population regarding issues like rude bus drivers and poorly maintained bus interiors toward the more systemic issues plaguing our poorly coordinated mobility networks.

Some highlights from Mr. Old’s comments:

“[What the public] is measuring [the Transportation Trust’s] performance on is more mass transit lines. So, I applaud you on the airport link, but we have not seen nearly enough progress on rail. . . . Heavy rail, light rail. . . . Get it going. Get it going. Where are our commissioners? If there’s not money in the plan, pull it from the municipalities.”

[. . .]

“There should be a line to the beach 10 years ago. There should be a line to the beach 20 years ago.”

[. . .]

“Nobody’s saying ‘Hey! Transit in Miami sucks! And we need it to be better!’ That’s what we want. We want more money, and we want you guys [the Transportation Trust] to hold our commissioners’ feet to the fire for that [half-penny sales] tax. If you have to pull it from road widening projects, then pull it. That’s what we want.”

Well said, Mr. Old.

citt-transportation-summit-community-forum

February 22, 2014 @ 10:00am

Miami-Dade Main Library Auditorium

101 West Flagler Street

Miami, FL 33130

From the CITT website:

A Listening Session

The Transportation Summit Community Forum features the Report on Proceedings, which details the outcome of the 2013 Transportation Summit. The purpose of this gathering is to solicit comments from the public on the Report and the future of public transportation in Miami-Dade County.

Join Miami-Dade County and its citizens in continuing the momentum for a comprehensive and coordinated public transportation system.

>>See the Transportation Summit Community Forum agenda.

For additional information call 305-375-1357 or email citt@miamidade.gov.

Taking transit to the meeting? Visit www.miamidade.gov/transit or call 305-770-3131 for route information.

For additional information call 305-375-1357 or email citt@miamidade.gov.

Tagged with:
 

The City of Miami’s Office of Communications released yesterday a short video on the Citizen’s Independent Transportation Trust’s (CITT) 2013 Miami-Dade Transportation Summit.

The elevator music and 1980’s electric guitar riff can be a little hard to endure, but it’s nonetheless interesting to have a glimpse at the City’s perspective on the Summit.

Featured in the video are the City’s Assistant Manager, Alice Bravo, who describes the role and responsibility of the CITT. Also featured is the City’s Special Project Assistant, Thomas Rodrigues, who talks about the City’s Trolley(-bus) routes.

Take a gander!

Tagged with:
 

This is not a joke. The Citizens Independent Transportation Trust is working (with the blessing of County Commissioner Moss) toward approving an $11 million road widening in an area of south Miami-Dade County that will only serve a few development interests. This will be yet another move that degrades our agricultural lands, leads to more suburban sprawl, and more depressed property values. One need only look at these two photos to note that widening these roads has nothing to do with ‘alleviating traffic’. Not now, not twenty years from now. The sprawl machine is not dead; its trying hard to get back to work, and we helping to pay for its recovery!

 At a time when our County government should reflect on the amount of environmental and economic damage it has legislated over the last decade, decisions like this only serve to remind us that the same incompetent and corrupt people are still in office. To say nothing of the fact that these are PTP dollars that were meant for transit NOT projects that aim to keep the same old road-building/ developer/sprawl planning+engineering  firms afloat. Shame on you CITT for not being stewards of our transit dollars.

Tagged with:
 

 An expensive, unnecessary planned project:  widening 157 Avenue from two to four lanes (with raised median) from SW 152nd St. to SW 184th St. 

This lane-doubling project is an ill-advised use of a further $11 million of CITT funds. Benefits claimed for this project, like the provision of north-south connectivity, are already available now, with no investment at all.  Traffic moves without congestion the whole day, including during morning and afternoon rush hours, as can be verified by site visits. This project is in the 5-year plan presented for CITT approval today. The CITT should amend the plan to remove this project. 

The Public Works Department [PWD] plans to conclude contracts this year for utility relocation and for construction.  The CITT memo accompanying the 5-year plan recommends for this project, “that traffic studies be updated prior to immediate commencement of construction.” This is not a promising step.  It sounds like the decision is already made and the traffic study is window dressing for starting as soon as possible.  In reality, the 2006 traffic study specifically indicated comfortable traffic levels far below capacity, but that did not deter Public Works, the County Administration, and Commissioner Moss from advocating this expensive road expansion. None of the official presentations of this project to the CITT communicated that the whole west side of this road segment is agricultural land outside the Urban Development Boundary [UDB].  This bordering on the UDB makes this segment different from the already improved segments of SW 157th Ave. to the north, which pass through populated areas on both sides of the road.  By omitting this information on the UDB, the presentations withhold information needed for an intelligent decision by the CITT. 

It defies common sense to change now to a super road whose usefulness will depend on moving the UDB further west, a development which this project clearly advances.  Miami-Dade, and especially the far southwest of the county, do not need more unfinished and unsold housing.  If, sometime in the future, the UDB in this area is moved and intensive outlying development is planned, then the County already owns the land for the widening to four lanes.  Also, the County could then negotiate with developers for their contribution to the cost of doubling the lanes.

Traffic counts, valid benefit/cost analysis using a social discount rate, common sense, and site visits all support not going ahead with this project at this time. 

Here is a further word on site visits. In 2003, the first year of the CITT, member Lt. Col. Antonio Colmenares visited proposed project sites.  In District 13, he found a road widening proposal that seemed unneeded.  Commissioner Natacha Sejas, who had included the project in the People’s Transportation Plan [PTP], agreed it was a mistake.  She proposed amending the PTP to remove the project, an action which was approved by the CITT at one of its first meetings. 

Current CITT members and staff would benefit from visiting this project site on SW 157th Ave.   

So far, no one has taken up my offer to drive anyone there at the peak morning or afternoon rush hours.  Perhaps members and staff have visited there on their own and will reflect their experiences in tonight’s discussion of the 5-year plan.  Or just check with me after this meeting. On April 5, I drove to the SW 157th Ave. site.  At 5:31. p.m. I drove the northbound 2.3 miles (with two stop signs) in 3.25 minutes.  I then drove the same southbound segment at 5:36 p.m. in 3.37 minutes.  Rush-hour traffic was moving faster than the 40 mph speed limit.

As the proposed 5-year plan indicates, many key PTP promises to the public are now cancelled or delayed for decades because of the federal and local financial crises.  Because of this the CITT and County staff must exercise discernment in setting priorities and in the selection and timing of PTP projects, including those suggested by Commissioners.  Commissioner Dennis Moss and his staff originally wanted to widen SW 147th Ave. instead, but the affected residents objected.  In the rush  to define projects for the PTP, the widening was transferred to this southern portion of SW 157th Ave., but this was not at all an original priority.  The CITT could amend the 5-year plan to remove this low priority project before it is even put out for construction bids.

Newer CITT members should know that in May, 2006, the CITT on a 5-3 vote first rejected the contract for the engineering study for this project.  A month later, after a questionable procedure, the CITT reversed itself and approved the project on a 6-3 vote.  I believe the consternation in the County Government caused by the initial rejection was not because this 157th Ave. project was crucial, but because the County Government was shocked that the CITT would reject a contract.

Please contact your commissioner and let them know this is NOT A GOOD USE OF PTP dollars!

Ted Wilde, CITT member 2003-07, chair of the Budget and Finance Committee & of the Project and Financial Review Committee

Thanks to the ITeam for looking into the misuse of transit surtax revenues, but there were a few things missing from your report. While cities in Miami-Dade do have parochial and shortsighted transit planning spending patterns, it’s the system that is at fault; forcing cities to jockey for an insanely low amount of money to apply to a worthy ‘transit’ project which typically run in the hundreds of millions - leaving them far short of what they would need to run a credible system. Not to mention the anemic leadership at the County Commission and their decade long fleecing of the 1/2 Transportation Tax for anything but transit. Wider roads? Check. New intersection lights? Check. Road repaving? Check.

The report also chides the City of Miami for doing the smart thing and saving the money it gets from the trust (not hoarding it as the article states). The small payments the cities get based on their population should be saved. With most of the cities occurring along or around an existing or future major transit corridor (the South Dade Busway, Metro-Rail, or the future SFECC) these funds could amount to the all important operations and maintenance costs that plague investments in premium transit. The constant mantra of the County Commission is that it must bear the burden of these costs - but what if the cities were able to leverage their portion of the surtax against the future operating costs of the system. That would be a powerful bargaining chip for the 20-odd cities that occur around the SFECC in particular - especially at a time when the MPO is not likely to support continuation of the project for the foreseeable future.  

A recently completed audit found that the cities have spent millions of dollars on projects that have nothing to do with transit or are specifically forbidden.

Miami Lakes spent part of their money for an on-demand taxi service. North Bay Village used the cash to build storm water drains. And Sweetwater used transit money to buy a garbage truck and pay police officers.

Charles Scurr is the executive director of the Citizens Independent Transit Trust, the agency which makes sure the money is spent appropriately. In cases where the money was misspent, the CITT can demand repayment.

The big missed story: what happened to the voter mandated (and legally required) independent trust that was to steward these funds through the morass of Miami-Dade County politics? It never materialized. The Citizens Independent Transportation Trust is a joke - and not because of a lack of effort on the part of its staff, but because it is not independent! To claim to be so is disingenuous, laughable, and probably illegal. We need a truly independent auditor to plan and implement a multimodal transportation network in Dade County. As long as the same tired politics play out in the County Commission chambers, transit will remain stagnant for years to come.

Funding and bus service were the themes of the night at the second annual Miami-Dade Transit Summit. In attendance were Mayor Alvarez, County Manager Burgess, Assistant County Manager and transit guru Ysela Llort, and Commissioners Barbara Jordon, Chairman Moss, and Carlos Gimenez. The audience was a mix of transit aficionados and transit users (or both) who gave a wide variety of suggestions on proposed route changes, funding mechanisms, and general discontent with the job the Commission and administration are doing to provide transit service to the citizens of Dade County.

The word affordability was repeated several times, and each time it made me cringe. How can we hold a public good like transit up to some artificial standard like affordability? Who determines what is affordable? Are our public schools affordable? Who pays for the O/M of the police and firefighters? We do. We determine what is affordable . Transit costs what it costs, and it needs to be funded whether the commission likes it or not. Affordability is not a factor, because if it was then the most affordable option would be to buy current transit users a car, dismantle MDT and call it a day. Why waste any more time and money on a public good you don’t think we can ‘afford’?

I was impressed by the many speakers who gave solid, common sense suggestions as to how to improve the system and to fund it. Here just a few of the observations I thought were on point:

  • Use the surplus of MDX toll revenue to provide premium transit. The MDX representative was proud of the nearly $10 million dollar contribution they had made to MDT, but that doesn’t go far enough. The New York MTA recieves over $400 million of surplus revenue from bridge and tunnel tolls. Why can’t MDX provide a similar service? Not to mention the roads that are not tolled at all, like the Palmetto. Even a modest toll on this road would go a long way to funding the O/M of our transit system.
  • Expand the tax increment districts to beyond go beyond the station areas. As transit is a good that reaches beyond the area surrounding the station, then so too should the tax benefit come from a wider area. Duh.
  • Increase the gas tax.
  • Stop giving away free rides to the elderly.
  • Provide a thorough audit of how the 20% share of the PTP that has been used by municipalities. (I especially like this one as I am pretty sure any audit will uncover how this money has been wasted.)

Some of the best comments came from members of the local Transport Workers Union 291. Intelligent, well thought out, and passionate comments were made by the men and women who are on the ground every day and know exactly how the system works (or doesn’t). They rightfully criticized the plans for BRT expansion, citing Phoenix, Atlanta and other cities that were investing in light rail, rather than BRT. With a similar O/M cost, and higher capacity I agree with them.

I had prepared comments, but by the time my turn came to speak, all of my points had been addressed by the other speakers, save for one. It was a challenge to the administration and Commission to stop blindly throwing money at the transit ‘problem’ without having any goals or benchmarks to measure success. Throughout the night, the common response to audience concerns was “Other cities have the same problems we do.” I agreed, but observed that they did have solutions to the problem, we just were not implementing these solutions. San Fransisco recently set a goal of 30% transit ridership by 2030, why can’t we do the same?

In her closing remarks Commissioner Jordon responded to my comments by saying that they did have goals, but didn’t have the funds to reach them. I don’t know if she understood what I was saying, but as a person who is well versed on the subject, I have yet to see in writing a commitment by Miami-Dade County to increase transit ridership by any amount. How can we guide our investments in all forms of transportation if we don’t lay out a framework to achieve certain goals?

In the mix of transportation options available to people we include cars, transit, and walking/biking.  Currently, our transit ridership share is only 2.5%, with walking/biking less than that, which means more than 90% of the trips taken in Dade County are by car. This is not an accident. In the same way we plan for future highway and roadway expansion to accommodate future ‘demand’, so too should we do the same for transit.

My challenge to the Commission and to Mayor Alvarez remains: make a goal of 30% transit ridership by 2030, and fund that goal. That is the only way we are going to get out of our transit black hole.

In yet another instance of wasted transit surtax dollars, the CITT voted yesterday to acquire land directly adjacent to the UDB in order to turn SW 157 avenue into a high-speed four lane urban highway. Too bad, this just gives opponents of the surtax more fuel to send it back to voters. Several more votes will be required to allocate funds for the construction of the road, so there is still time to contact your commissioner and let them know that the surtax should not be used on roadway expansion.

Tagged with:
 

To CITT Members

From Ted Wilde, former CITT member 2003-07, Chair of Project and Financial Review

Re: May 28 CITT item to acquire land for widening SW 157 Ave. would be a poor use of scarce surtax funds

Summary. On April 16 the Project and Financial Review Committee split 2-2 on the resolution to acquire 15 properties for adding two lanes to SW 157 Ave. from SW 152 St. to SW 184 St. so the resolution is to be presented “without recommendation” to the May 28 full CITT. The CITT can reject this unnecessary project that will lead to misusing $13.2 million of surtax funds for road construction on the Urban Development Boundary. Supporters of the project state that SW 157 Ave. needs to connect to SW 184 St. Fine, it already connects completely; traffic on this road flows freely throughout the day, including during rush hours.

CITT can envision better alternatives. In the current severe reduction of government funds and of the transit projects in the People’s Transportation Plan [PTP], the CITT can preserve funds for projects directly serving transit users. Last year, Miami-Dade Transit applied rigorous cost-benefit criteria to cut back bus routes and frequencies. Doubling of the number of lanes of this part of SW 157 Ave. could not pass a cost-benefit analysis. Acquiring these 15 parcels is certainly not “a Public Necessity.”

In the face of all the transit cutbacks, the County Administration continues to seek completion of all PTP road and street projects proposed by County Commissioners. This is an insult to the citizens and also to Commissioners, as if they were so inflexible that they could not accept changes in 2009 to projects they proposed in 2002.

Funds the CITT saves now can be redirected later for future modest-cost transit efforts like bus rapid transit.

The County omitted essential information for an informed CITT decision. The documentation presented to CITT members before the Project and Financial Review meeting was highly deficient. It did not inform the CITT that the entire length of the proposed construction is on the Urban Development Boundary. The whole west side of this road segment is agricultural land; only the east side has mainly residential development. This part of SW 157 Ave with one side without residences will not generate the level of traffic of the road to the north where both sides are developed.

The previous documentation does not explain that the payments for land acquisition (cost not estimated), the $1.155 million for H & J Asphalt, and $228,228 for FP&L are only the start. A few years ago, total land and construction costs were projected at $13.2 million, a 35 % increase from the original projection of $9.75 million.

The documentation does not give the results of the traffic count on May 17, 2006, which showed that even in peak morning and afternoon rush hours, the traffic level never reached more than 55 % of “LOS 3,” the Level of Service of “stable flow,” which is the usual target for urban highways. An updated traffic count this year would be useful.

History of this project. The original engineering study for this project was voted down by the CITT in May 2006. It was reconsidered and passed in June 2006 (without having being placed on the published agenda).

Visit the site. Useful preparation for making a decision on this proposal is to visit the site during morning or afternoon rush hour. I visited the site on Thursday, April 2, 2009, at 7:58 a.m. In the 2006 traffic study, 8:00-8:30 a.m. was the peak of the rush hour. Starting on SW 157 Ave. at SW 184 St., I drove north to SW 152 St., back south the whole way, back north, south, and north again, 5 complete trips of the 2.3 mile route. I drove easily at 41 mph (speed limit 40), stopping at the two stop signs along the way. There is also a stop sign at SW 184 St., and the traffic light at SW 152 St.  At each end, I had to make a u-turn. Total time for the 5 trips and 4 u-turns was 24 minutes. Commuter drivers elsewhere in Miami-Dade would be fortunate to have such an easy ride.

The CITT will be holding a vote tonight on the proposed widening of SW 157 Avenue from 152 street to 184 street.  Currently a two lane road, 157 avenue is adjacent to the UDB, and will be converted into a higher speed four lane collector. This is yet another colossal waste of taxpayer dollars (to the tune of $13.2 million), and a great example of how the transportation tax has been wasted on projects that exacerbate our traffic problems, while not addressing our defunct transit system. Keep in mind that this road is close to Lennar’s proposed Parkland development (on 152 Street) and will surely come into play once the UDB battle ramps up again.

The meeting is at 6 p.m. at the Stephen P. Clark County Center, 111 NW 1st St. Please come out and let the members of the CITT know that road widening next to the UDB is a BAD idea and not what the transit tax is for!

Tagged with:
 

Lot going on today, but there always is isn’t there…

  • The Miami-Dade Office of Sustainability & the City of Miami are teaming up to get grant money from the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance by forming a “non-profit entity to deliver energy services to residents and businesses within County geographic boundaries that provide performance based energy audits, retrofits and renewable energy across building types.”
  • Cutting the fat: Miami Dade Transit is cutting bus lines and expenses. “Buses are to serve the Metromover system but are to end at the Omni station to encourage riders to use the mover to get around the city “to reduce our mileage and also traffic congestion in downtown,” Mr. Kapoor said. Officials based the changes on passenger counts and rider feedback.”
  • Plan B:  Now that the commission has voted not to fix the CITT, Commissioner Gimenez is going to try to organize a voter referendum. The CITT is answering with its own Plan B: “The trust and county continue to mull using light rail or bus rapid transit to serve the corridors that were promised heavy rail…Some trust members suggested also considering a sunset provision for the measure that mingles the surtax funds with the general transit budget, as there may be a financially healthier time in the future that could eliminate or lessen the need for what administrators call “unification.”
  • Tri-rail funding from Miami-Dade Counyt  is ok…for now. “Attempts to secure a dedicated state funding source for the cash-strapped South Florida commuter rail system failed during the legislative session, and Tri-Rail officials plan to nearly halve weekday service and eliminate weekend trains anticipating reduced funding from local governments.”
  • Miami 21…delayed again. The next earliest meeting is in June (barring some unknown/unannounced special meeting between now and June 11).

Tagged with:
 

Commissioner Gimenez’s proposed changes to the CITT were rejected in yesterday’s Commission hearing by a 6 - 6 vote. I was sad to see the 6 no votes -  Audrey Edmonson, Barbara Jordon, Chariman Moss, Javier Souto, Bruno Barreiro, and Joe Martinez. This would have been the first good decision the Commission made with regard to transit and the CITT. Too Bad. Commissioner Gimenez can now continue his mission to take the tax back to the voters. If he is successful you can be sure that the tax will be no more.

Meanwhile, his opinion’s on transit have taken a turn for the bizzare. Check out this interview with Carlos Gimenez produced by WPBG, Channel 2. His assesment of the CITT is right on, but his Plan B is a disaster. Gimenez contends that the car “is the most underutilized form of transit in this country.”  Is he kidding?

While not proving any details, he suggests that ‘outside the box thinking’ such as carpooling and other car related programs should be the focus of our transit system. (A  bad idea.) Commissioner Gimenez: We need a functional mass transit system that gets people out of their cars. We do not need to continue a falty land development system that relies on the car. An economic comparison of  cars vs. mass transit will show that the car loses when taking into account social and environmental costs. Upfront costs might be more for certain forms of transit, but the long term economic benefit of  investment around transit outweighs the initial cost.

This reminds me of a property I help my grandfather manage. It is an old 1940’s house that desperately needs a new roof (it has the same original tongue & groove roof deck from the 1940’s!), and considering the rain we’ve been getting the last two days I have gotten a few calls from the residents. Not only that, the interior has not been updated in at least thirty years. So I say, “Abuelo, its time to invest in repairs and upgrades! With a small but significant investment you can make more money over the long term.” Abuelo always says no, and calls the roofer to apply tar liberally over the existing roof as a patch. Rent remains low, and turnover high, but I know with strategic investment we can make a big impact in how much rent is collected.

It is the same with mass transit. Highways and cars (the tar patch we continue to rely on) suffer from bad diminishing returns - they are an inefficient form of transit, yet we continue to spend money on roadway expansion and repaving rather than investing in mass transit. The upfront costs of  transit are greater, but the long term benefits are also greater. We need to start somewhere.

Tagged with:
 
  • The South Dade Coalition is fighting FPL’s plans for transmission lines down US1 as these would keep the corridor from developing into the mixed-use, walkable place they seek. Good job guys.
  • Coral Gables is extending its trolley down ponce from 8th street to Flagler using FDOT dollars for the first year.
  • Dade and Broward Counties are getting express buses to run on I95 and the turnpike, linking Downtown Miami and Downtown Ft. Lauderdale and the ‘burbs. Yay! The routes are being funded by the State of Florida and the Federal government - no MDT money, also good.
  • A State Judge has said that the County’s decision to move the UDB was illegal. This is going to have big implications for the upcoming vote on Parkland.
  • No word on the Miami 21 vote yet from the City of Miami. Jeez.
  • More on taking the CITT back to voters from State Rep. Carlos Lopez Cantera: “Unless the county commission reaches some sort of an accord, I’m going to explore legislation to call for a vote of the voters again. It should be up to the voters to decide, and let them judge if they’re satisfied with the way the money has been handled.” From Miami Today.
  • The Virginia Key Masterplan is going to be presented on May 20 at the Miami Museum of Science, 3820 South Miami Ave, from 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm. This is in anticipation of its consideration by the City Commission in June. If you are interested, please attend.

Finally our Commissioners are starting to use their cocos. You will remember that last week Commissioner Gimenez led a well intentioned, but ill fated attempt to abolish the CITT.  Since that proposal was a bad idea (and died when put to a vote), the Commish has proposed his Plan B, a more practical approach to the Surtax problem. Here are some of the changes:

  • The Trust will have 17 members (rather than 15), and simplifies who appoints members.
  • Surtax dollars can only be used on projects in the People’s Transportation Plan (Exhibit 1).
  • Any future changes to the PTP must be approved by 2/3 of the Trust and 4/5 of the Commission. (This is a tricky one!)
  • Any Existing Contractual Obligations that were not part of the original plan, and were not executed must be approved by 2/3 of the trust and 4/5 of the Commission. Similarly, any Contract that was executed and up for re-approval,  but was not part of the original PTP must also be voted 2/3 Trust, 4/5 Commission. In either instance, if the projects are not approved the money must be reimbursed to the Trust.

This is a really good step in the right direction. It addresses how the funds are to be used from now on, and provides a mechanism for correcting the previous expenditures. My concern is that it still provides the Commission a say in the Plan. For the CITT to be a truly independent body it has to cut ties with the Commission. That is what I voted for and that is what I expect. Under Gimenez’s proposal, the Commission would choose 3 Board members, and so would the Mayor (creating an even political playing field). Beyond that the Commission should have NO say in what projects are in the PTP or how Surtax dollars are spent.

In a similar piece of legistlation, Commisioner Rebeca Sosa has proposed her own changes to the CITT. As with Commissioner Gimenez, Commissioner Sosa is off the mark with regard to the Commission’s continued control over the CITT, this time for projects more than $2 million in value (as most major expenditures will be). What she gets right, and what is lacking in the Gimenez Plan, is a mechanism by which the PTP is regularly updated and re-evaluated. She suggests every four years, but maybe this is an opportunity to put Commissioner Moss’ proposal for yearly transportation summits to work. Once a year the Trust should hold a series community charrettes that identify future transit opportunities, and evaluate the work done-to-date.

Making the Trust truly independant and providing for regular community inspired plan updates will make the plan relevant again, and push us toward a less car-dependant future.

Tagged with:
 
This site is protected by Comment SPAM Wiper.