11/20/07

Alternative Transportation

Having been a citizen of Miami for nearly three weeks now, it has become increasingly clear to me how vital the work at transitmiami.com truly is. As with all things Miami, it seems that many of the elements that make Miami so wonderful are in constant battle with the elements that hamper its greatness. The realities of traffic, congestion, infrastructure, public transportation and the reliance and love affair with the automobile are a major burden. The fallout of this reality is not limited to, but includes-after just a few week- significant limits the potential for productivity, impacts on the environment, and an unfortunate blanket of struggle over daily life. I for one, as I believe for certain many concerned Miamians do as well, have been trying to find alternative solutions, however, there is little help in place, with woefully inadequate public transport options. It will require nothing less than getting very creative. Aquatic mass transport, in this oasis of waterways is perhaps, a logical good step. More will need to be done than to leave it to the one man solution illustrated here, however, zero impact on the environment is a good thing.

7 Comments:

Rybu said...

You need champions, elected officials, transportation planners and interested residents.

Ultimately a paradigm shift in transportation is needed.

The 1950's was the last real paradigm shift, it left us with an interstate system that we can't even afford to maintain now, let alone adequately fund public transportation and alternative transportation.

Money is the key. Gas taxes are USER fees, not a traditional tax. I see a Vehicle Miles Traveled based fee in the future.

Fuel efficient vehicles may help the environment but they kill state transportation funds and is causing the highway trust fund to dwindle.

James Wilkins said...

That is hardly the point. The paradigm shift that could begin to be addressed could include water taxi's and pedestrian ferries. As the population of the beach increases and the working communities of Downtown and Brickell increase water transportation would alleviate the burden on the roadways, not to mention be a beautiful commuting experience.

James Wilkins said...

Disregard first sentence.

Anonymous said...

Aren't boats terribly inefficient? They are also expensive to purchase, to maintain, and are slow. It would be one thing if we didn't have three causeways to Miami Beach already...

I would much rather have a way to get to the metrorail (or downtown, DWNTWN, hah) that took less than 35-45 minutes of loud and bumpy bus riding.

James Wilkins said...

Clearly the solution lies in coming at the problem from many different angles.

Anonymous said...

We need public officials that have the political will to build lite rail throughout the cities of Miami-Dade. Interconnecting the various municipalities, and allowing for greater movement of people on independent lines that are not affected by traffic tie ups. You'll hear a lot of talk, but until politicians seriously move on the transit issue, we will be this inefficient county. Transit choices offer commuters freedom. Call your elected official and tell them you want them to stand up for your freedom and vote to strongly support transit.

James Wilkins said...

That kind of stand and call to arms is exactly what will be necessary. Nothing less will do it.