Currently viewing the tag: "Miami Dade Police Department"

Since the hit and run collision that killed cyclist Christoph LeCanne in January, the Transit Miami Eye has noticed that the Miami Dade Police Department has wholeheartedly stepped up enforcement on the Rickenbacker Causeway.  This morning I noticed a small army of Miami Dade police officers pulling over speeding cars. Well done MDPD, your efforts have not been overlooked.

Thank you MDPD!

Busted. Speeders can run, but they can't hide from the MDPD.

Unfortunately, even with the additional enforcement, many hazards still remain.  Additional enforcement certainly helps, but is not a long term solution for the Rickenbacker Causeway.  We still have a roadway that is designed to encourage cars to travel in excess of the posted 45 mph speed limit, which in and of itself is too high. Even with all the additional enforcement, I saw several cars traveling in excess of 60 mph today. Speeding is particularly prevalent on bridges, where it difficult for the police to set up speed traps. Drivers are aware of this and take the opportunity to rev-up their engines. For this reason, bridges are the most dangerous sections of the Rickenbacker Causeway for cyclists.

What we really need to do is design a roadway that polices itself.  If we were to construct a roadway with a design speed of 35-40 mph, we would not require the coveted services of our police department. Instead the valuable resources of the Miami Dade Police Department could be allocated to deal with the more pressing issues of our community. Please do not misconstrue what I am trying to say, I really am grateful for everything the Miami Dade Police Department has done for the cycling community. They have been very supportive of us, but enforcement is only part of the solution to the many issues that plaque the Rickenbacker Causeway.

Today I also saw a Miami Fire Department truck parked in the bike lane. A bike lane that also doubles as a shoulder creates a major conflict for cyclists when motor vehicles are parked in it.  You can also see several other pictures of Miami Dade County employees parked in the bike lane that Transit Miami reader Yaniel Cantelar sent to us last week.

Motor vehicles parked in the bike lane create major conflict areas for cyclists

On my morning ride on the Rickenbacker Causeway I saw a small army of police officers from the Miami Dade Police Department handing out tickets to motorists. There were at least two MDPD unmarked cars and a motorcycle enforcing the speed limit.  This is really great.  The MDPD has really stepped-up enforcement and it has not gone unnoticed.

Unfortunately, enforcement is not the sole solution.  We need to design a roadway which discourages speeding.  Even with all the added enforcement, I saw many cars speeding on Rickenbacker Causeway today.

Keep up the great work MDPD! You are part of the solution and we appreciate your efforts.

The Miami Dade Police Department has provided Transit Miami with their Rickenbacker Causeway enforcement statistics for 2009 and January 2010.  As you can see below the Miami Dade Police Department has been enforcing their jurisdiction on the Rickenbacker Causeway.  They are issuing approximately 7 hazardous moving violations per day to motorists. Enforcement is clearly present. What we need is a roadway that is designed to discourage people from speeding. Even with police enforcement motorists continue to speed on the Rickenbacker Causeway. More enforcement may help, but is not the ultimate solution. Designing a roadway for all users is the answer.

2009
Month Hazardous 1 Moving Violations Non-Hazardous2 Moving Violations Verbal Warnings Total
January 136 97 67 300
February 227 142 108 477
March 252 76 117 445
April 257 102 97 456
May 257 138 151 546
June 218 119 83 420
July 203 75 93 371
August 147 85 86 318
September 174 89 153 416
October 216 168 112 496
November 222 90 97 409
December 115 99 113 327
Total 2009 4,981
Total 2009 Hazardous Moving Violations 2,424
Average 2009 Hazardous Moving Violations Issued Per Day 6.64
2010
January 270 120 120 510
Average January 2010 Hazardous Moving Violations Issued Per Day 8.71
1. Hazardous violations are those which have the immediate potential for bodily injury
and property destruction; for example, running a red light or stop sign, or careless driving
2. Non-hazardous violations are those not likely to expose persons to injury or result in property damage;
for example, expired tag or defective equipment.

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